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RtoP Educational Tools

One of the main priorities to advance the Responsibility to Protect is for actors at all levels to understand what governments committed to at the 2005 World Summit when they recognized that all Member States and the international community have a responsibility to protect populations from genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing.

The following links are tools designed for civil society, government officials and individuals to increase their understanding of RtoP and how to further the advance of the norm. These documents are updated with the latest developments on RtoP and we hope they are helpful resources to our partners, old and new. 

Note: To find summaries and analyses of the Secretary-General's reports and General Assembly dialogues on RtoP, click here.
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2017: Infographic on RtoP in Africa

Click on the above link to read more about the role of the Responsibility to Protect in Africa.


2017: Infographic on RtoP in Peacekeeping Operations

Click on the above link to read more about the role of the Responsibility to Protect in Peacekeeping Operations.


2016: Looking Back and Moving Forward, a Reflection on 10 Years of the Responsibility to Protect

Click on the link above to see civil soceity perspectives on the first 10 years of the Responsibility to Protect. This document is a reflection on the progress of RtoP over its first decade, the challenges it has faced and still faces, and how we can move RtoP forward in its second decade.

2016: Infographics to Mark Genocide Awareness Month

To honor Genocide Awareness Month, we are releasing a set of infographics designed to be used as educational tools on atrocity crimes and their prevention/response. Find a quick guide to the UN's Framework of Analysis for Atrocity Crimes here; National Mechanisms for the Prevention of Atrocity Crimes here; and the U.S.'s Atrocity Prevention Board here.

2015: Women, Peace and Security and the Responsibility to Protect (updated: 2017) 
This publication examines how the two agendas of Women, Peace and Security and the Responsibility to Protect can be mainstreamed together in order to achieve a better, more holistic protection of populations. Read an infographic on WPS and RtoP here.

2015: Infographics on the Use of the Security Council veto
Click on the link above to see an overview of where the veto has been used and the two initiatives aiming to curb its use in situations of atrocity crimes. Click on our map to see which Member States support these initiatives. 

2015: How Can Civil Society Implement the Responsibility to Protect?

To assist in increasing understanding of the impact of CSOs in upholding RtoP as well as spurring further action for atrocities prevention, this newly-updated document will provide an overview of initiatives led by organizations throughout the world as well as suggestions for additional steps to promote and implement RtoP and atrocities prevention.

2015: #RtoP10:
 What Can Your Organization Do to Advance the Responsibility to Protect at 2015?
As part of the #R2P10 blog series, ICRtoP has prepared an infographic detailing ways that civil society organizations interested in advancing the Responsibility to Protect can use the 10th anniversary of its adoption as an opportunity to mobilize support at the national, regional, and international levels to strengthen approaches for the prevention and response to mass atrocities. Lisez l'infographie en français.

2015: 
Arms and Atrocities: Protecting Populations by Preventing the Means
This document highlights how disarmament and arms control can help actors to implement the Responsibility to Protect. Additionally, the document outlines recommendations for how civil society organizations can work to advance atrocities prevention and humanitarian disarmament. 


2014: At a Glance: Clarifying the Second Pillar of the Responsibility to Protect: Building State Capacity to Prevent Atrocity Crimes
Clarifying the Second Pillar identifies the three forms of Pillar II assistance—encouragement, capacity building, and protection assistance—while further exploring the broad range of actors involved and measures available to assist States as they seek to protect their populations from mass atrocity crimes. Additionally, we highlight challenges that may arise when assisting to prevent atrocities, and reflect on possibilities for addressing them. 

2014: RtoP at the United Nations

This document describes important normative advancements since the 2005 World Summit, including the Security Council Resolution 1674 on the Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict, Resolution 1706 authorizing UN peacekeeping troops to Darfur, and the appointment of the Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide and the Special Adviser on the Responsibility to Protect. The document also describes some of the setbacks since 2005. 

2014: At a Glance: Q & A's on RtoP and Country Situations

In these newest "At a Glance" documents, we provide a 2-page overview of how RtoP relates to seven current conflict situations: Syria, the Central African Republic, Burma, Darfur, Nigeria, North Korea, South Sudan, and Kenya. The Q & A's give a brief background of the crises; an outline of why the international community has a responsibility to protect populations in these countries; and explanations of how various actors have or have not upheld this responsibility. 

2014: Domesticating RtoP and the Prevention of Mass Atrocities
This document outlines five government mechanisms that seek to put atrocity prevention into practice, and the ways that civil society can monitor, support, and otherwise engage with such actors and institutions. The ICRtoP hopes civil society worldwide will use this document to inform and guide their cooperation with these national initiatives.

2013: RtoP And...Exploring the Relationship Between the Responsibility to Protect and Your Sector
This document examines the linkages between R2P norms and a variety of civil society actors and sectors, including conflict prevention, human rights, humanitarian assistace, and others.  It highlights how many civil society sectors are already involved in the advancement of R2P, as evidended by the development of early warning systems and through the monitoring of crises from an atrocities prevention lens. Lisez la publication en français.

2013: ICRtoP launches Toolkit on the Responsibility to Protect

We are excited to share with you the Coalition’s latest educational tool - a new Toolkit on the Responsibility to Protect. As you may know, we have spent the last several months refining and finalizing this comprehensive document, and have attached the final version to this email.
 
ICRtoP developed this toolkit to enhance widespread access to comprehensive teaching tools on the Responsibility to Protect and increase the capacity of civil society organizations, policymakers, security sector representatives, academics, and others to undertake activities to improve understanding of the norm and how it can be implemented among actors at all levels. Our hope is that the toolkit will be used to (1) Improve understanding of and build support for the Responsibility to Protect among civil society organizations, academics, the media, governments, parliamentarians and regional and sub-regional organizations; and (2) Engage in practical, constructive discussions with these actors on how they can enhance efforts - through capacity-building, policy development and more – to prevent and respond to genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and ethnic cleansing.
 
This document describes important normative advancements since the 2005 World Summit, including the Security Council Resolution 1674 on the Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict, Resolution 1706 authorizing UN peacekeeping troops to Darfur, and the appointment of the Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide and the Special Adviser to the Secretary General with a focus on the Responsibility to Protect. The document also describes some of the setbacks since 2005. 

2012: At a Glance Document Series
The ICRtoP released a series of At a Glance documents ahead of the 2012 General Assembly dialogue on measures and actors under the Third Pillar of RtoP. 

2012: What can your organization do to advance and promote the Responsibility to Protect?

This document articulates what NGOs can do to advance RtoP, including raising awareness, conducting advocacy, building civil society support and conducting research, and to operationalize the norm.

2011: National endorsements of Responsibility to Protect: policy papers, strategy documents and focal points
States have begun to reflect their continued support for RtoP by including references to the norm in government documents/actions. This chart includes excerpts of the inclusion of RtoP at the national level. 

2011: FAQ on the Impact of Action in Libya on the Responsibility to Protect
ICRtoP has responded to frequently-asked-questions on the impact of the application of the Responsibility to Protect to the war crimes and crimes against humanity alleged to have occurred in Libya. The document focuses on how the international community responded to the crisis and why the response was consistent with the RtoP framework.

2011: Clarifying the Third Pillar of the Responsibility to Protect: Timely and Decisive Response

Too often, Member States, media and NGOs conflate the third pillar of the Responsibility to Protect with the use of force. This two-page document spells out the many measures that fall under the third pillar, and the actors involved in implementing these measures.

2011: Latest Developments at the UN since the World Summit
This document describes important normative advancements since the 2005 World Summit, including the Security Council Resolution 1674 on the Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict, Resolution 1706 authorizing UN peacekeeping troops to Darfur, and the appointment of the Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide and the Special Adviser to the Secretary General with a focus on the Responsibility to Protect. The document also describes some of the setbacks since 2005. 
 
This document analyses the need to develop a gendered response to conflct and how the Responsibility to Protect complements existing commitments to protect women's human rights and can act as a tool for incorporating women's leadership in preventing and stopping mass atrocity crimes.

ICRtoP Updates Compilation of National endorsements of Responsibility to Protect: Policy Papers, Strategy Documents and Focal Points: This overview maps how States have begun to reflect their continued support for RtoP by including references to the norm in government documents, actions, and policies.  (December 2011)
 
This comprehensive document includes background and summary of the controversial OHCHR Mapping Exercise covering serious violations of international law in the DRC between 1993 and 2003.
 

This brochure gives an overview of RtoP, addressing why RtoP is necessary as well as the existing international support for the norm.  The document also provides important information about the International Coalition. English, French and Spanish versions are available.

2010: What did governments from your region say at the General Assembly debate on the Responsibility to Protect?
Under this link, you'll find five documents which outline the positions of Member States from the five major regions during the July 2009 General Assembly debate on the Responsibility to Protect. 

2009: Global Consultative Roundtables on the Responsibility to Protect: Civil Society Perspectives and Recommendations for Action
This report details the conclusions of seven civil society roundtables held from February to August 2008 in Thailand, Canada, Argentina, Uganda, South Africa, France, and Ghana. The report includes common challenges in actualizing R2P, common themes from all roundtables, and participant-suggested strategies and activities for each region to advance R2P. 

This comprehensive brochure explains the process leading to the 2005 World Summit and the endorsement of RtoP. It includes quotes from governments and the media, as well as ideas for how civil society can push RtoP principles forward. We also include a timeline of some of the international communitys worst failures to protect populations during the 1990s to put RtoP into context.
 This R2PCS document presents some of the most commonly asked questions regarding RtoP that have been raised in our conversations with governments, NGOs, academics and the media and provide detailed responses.

2005: A Summary of ICISS Report
This summary, compiled by R2PCS, highlights the many important recommendations of the 2001 report of the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty that first introduced the RtoP concept.



 

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