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14 September 2006

Responsibility to Protect Engaging Civil Society

Web: www.responsibilitytoprotect.org

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In this issue:
[Darfur, R2P]

List of Articles:

I. Darfur
1. SECURITY COUNCIL MEMBERS DISCUSS VIOLENCE IN DARFUR; R2P INVOKED
2. PRESS CONFERENCE BY GENERAL ASSEMBLY PRESIDENT JAN ELIASSON
3. BRIEFING EN ROUTE HALIFAX NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA BY US SECRETARY OF STATE CONDOLEEZZA RICE
4. SECRETARY-GENERAL'S PRESS CONFERENCE - OPENING REMARKS
5. PRESSURE RATCHETS UP OVER DARFUR

II. R2P
1. NEWLY FORMED R2P COALITION CELEBRATES FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF
ADOPTION OF ''RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT'' AND LAUNCHES AMERICAN
ASSAULT AGAINST ATROCITY CRIMES



I. DARFUR

1. SECURITY COUNCIL MEMBERS DISCUSS VIOLENCE IN DARFUR; R2P INVOKED
UN Organisation
11 September 2006

Addressing the Security Council as it met to discuss the deteriorating situation in Darfur, the Secretary-General strongly urged the Council to act, adding it was not the time for middle ground or for half measures. He strongly condemned the escalation, referring to the Responsibility to Protect its citizens that Sudan is unable or unwilling to enforce, and thus that transcends into the hands of the international community. To view excerpts from Mr. Annans remarks, as well as relevant governmental responses (references to R2P included), please follow the link below:
http://www.responsibilitytoprotect.org/index.php/united_nations/c37
Full text (meeting record and press release) available: http://www.responsibilitytoprotect.org/index.php/united_nations/c37

2. PRESS CONFERENCE BY GENERAL ASSEMBLY PRESIDENT JAN ELIASSON
UN Department of public information
11 September 2006
Despite global tensions and suspicions, the General Assembly had proven during its sixtieth session that it could take decisions, Assembly President Jan Eliasson of Sweden told correspondents this afternoon in a wrap-up press conference on the Assemblys work and his last as Assembly President. ()
While not on the Assemblys agenda, he said he was extremely concerned about developments in Darfur. He had wanted to put the situation there in the prospective of the Responsibility to Protect, which must move from words to deeds. The international community had, in the past, seen the horrors of Cambodia, Rwanda and Srebrenica. That must not happen again. e now have such a situation in front of us, where this principle -- this responsibility -- has to be taken seriously, he said.
There had also been some nfinished business, including strengthening of the Economic and Social Council and Security Council reform, he said. Many of the items on the Assemblys agenda were a work in progress. Member States would now have to put those accomplishments to the test in the field. The international community was at a serious stage in testing whether multilateralism worked. By pushing forward the reforms, the Assembly had had one way to prove that it may have passed the test. ()
Responding to questions on Darfur, including the possibility of humanitarian intervention, he noted that, unfortunately, Darfur was not on the Assemblys agenda. The international community had to be extremely concerned about what was happening there. The time had come to translate Responsibility to Protect from words to action. Before reaching the stage of humanitarian intervention, all countries needed to put maximum pressure on the Sudanese Government to accept their Responsibility to Protect. He hoped the Sudans neighbors, African countries and the permanent five would exert maximum pressure on the Government, and, hopefully, bring it to the conclusion that there was a need to stop the killing.
There was general agreement on the need to put maximum pressure on the Sudanese Government, he added in response to another question. The Council was faced with a grave responsibility and a very difficult issue. As former Emergency Relief Coordinator, he recognized the urgency of the situation. The international community also needed to keep its eyes and ears there. Humanitarian workers were taking great risks in Darfur, serving as those eyes and ears. An international presence was needed.
Some academics would argue that the whole reform process had not been a clear net gain. At the end of the day, did he wonder whether the entire reform process had reached a stage where ground had actually been lost rather than gained, exposing nasty differences between States? a correspondent asked.
Responding, he said he had tried to be realistic in his assessment and had stressed the need for results. While the Outcome document provided a long o do list, gains had been made. Two reforms represented qualitative gains, namely the establishment of a Peacebuilding Commission and the creation of the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF). He knew the humiliating situation of having to ask for money when people were dying. With some $260 million in the CERF already, the Fund would provide immediate resources. ()
Full text:
http://www.un.org/News/briefings/docs//2006/060911_Eliasson.doc.htm
3. BRIEFING EN ROUTE HALIFAX NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA BY US SECRETARY OF STATE CONDOLEEZZA RICE
Secretary Condoleezza Rice
US Department of State
September 11, 2006
() QUESTION: [One] on Sudan. You met with the Foreign Minister today. Is there any progress to report towards an agreement on peacekeepers?
SECRETARY RICE: I did meet with the Foreign Minister and I gave him a very strong message that the international community and the United States expect Sudan to accept, indeed facilitate, a UN international force. The Government of Sudan has not been able to -- not able to or not willing to -- stabilize the situation in Darfur. That situation has not gotten better; indeed, there are concerns that it may get worse. And we have no choice as an international community to insist that there will be an international force that can protect the innocent, can protect aid workers, can prevent a humanitarian crisis, because the Government of Sudan has not been willing or able to do that.
The UN has had a long debate in this recent UN reform discussion about the Responsibility to Protect. Well, it's time for the international community to exercise the Responsibility to Protect, and that means a UN force.
So I won't say that we made progress, but I will say that I delivered the strongest possible message in the strongest possible terms to the Sudanese Government that any hope for bettering relations between the United States and the Sudan rests on Sudan's cooperation with this UN Security Council resolution.
QUESTION: (off-mic.)
SECRETARY RICE: He brought a letter to the President, which I have not seen. I am transmitting it. And he brought hope for better relations between the United States and Sudan and I told him in no uncertain terms that that wasn't on the agenda unless the Sudan acted responsibly. ()
Full text: http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2006/72040.htm

4. SECRETARY-GENERAL'S PRESS CONFERENCE - OPENING REMARKS
UN News Centre
13 September 2006
()We have other urgent tasks on our agenda. Darfur for one, which the Council discussed only recently. The situation there is desperate. The Government continues to refuse to accept the transition to the UN. The presence of the African Union forces is itself not certain, and we are going to continue our efforts and I have appealed to all the governments with influence to work with the Sudanese Government, and get the Government to change its attitude and its approach, because if the African Union forces were to leave, and we are not able to put in a UN follow-on force, we are heading for a disaster, and I don't think we can allow that to happen, particularly since we only recently passed the Responsibility to Protect resolution. And not only that, when we had Rwanda, almost everyone said we should not let it happen again. So we have a big challenge in Sudan. ()
Full Text: http://www.un.org/apps/sg/offthecuff.asp?nid=939
5. PRESSURE RATCHETS UP OVER DARFUR
Christian Science Monitor
Howard LaFranchi
September 13, 2006
()A decade after the world looked on as hundreds of thousands of people died in Rwanda and Bosnia, Sudan's region of Darfur is emerging as a test of whether the world can do better this time. ()
The showdown, which is likely to run into next week's UN General Assembly opening session here, is shaping up as a signature 21st- century battle pitting national sovereignty against international authority and an expanding sense of humanity's right to protection.()
President Bush has upped the ante, offering to meet with Mr. Bashir when both leaders are expected to attend next week's General Assembly debate. But Bashir may not be anxious to meet a leader who two years ago accused his regime of genocide in Darfur, analysts say. ()
Indeed, many leaders are counting on the efforts of Egypt, which was instrumental in gaining Khartoum's acceptance of the African Union force. Egyptian officials say they believe agreement with Sudan can still be achieved, but they do not favor imposition of an international force. ()
Yet with the clock ticking, more voices are calling for the UN to send a force even if Khartoum does not accept it. Sen. John McCain (R) of Arizona and former Sen. Bob Dole said in an opinion piece in The Washington Post Sunday that the Bush administration should press the UN to draw up such contingency plans. ()
"The international community can begin by enforcing steps it has already taken against the Sudanese government, Mr. Valdo says. "The world community should immediately enforce the targeted sanctions the Security Council has already approved," he says. "If they don't do that, then the humanitarian disaster is what will unfold."
Full Text: http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0913/p01s02-wogi.html


II. R2P


1. NEWLY FORMED R2P COALITION CELEBRATES FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF ADOPTION OF ''RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT'' AND LAUNCHES AMERICAN ASSAULT AGAINST ATROCITY CRIMES
Business Wire
September 12, 2006

An organized effort to convince America's citizens and leaders to reestablish their country's moral authority in the world by abolishing genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as called for in the Responsibility to Protect doctrine, was launched today in Chicago.
Businessman and entrepreneur Richard Cooper unveiled the formation of the R2P Coalition composed of internationally recognized human rights, academic, philanthropic and religious leaders, who will help lead this effort. The R2P Coalition calls attention to an amazing doctrine passed by the UN General Assembly one year ago that lays the foundation for ending atrocity crimes. The Coalition encourages American citizens to demand that their political leaders - on local, state and national scales - commit themselves to leading this effort worldwide by adopting a strong moral stance and by making this issue a major consideration in the upcoming 2008 elections. ()
The goals of the R2P Coalition are unique in the sense that the Coalition does not limit itself to genocide and that, in accordance with what the international community committed itself to, it calls for a comprehensive approach to dealing with these crimes: from prevention, to reaction, to rebuilding. "It is important to convince the American public and our leadership to embrace R2P as a domestic and foreign policy priority. This is a long term effort, and it requires a shift in our vision of the world and of our responsibilities as human beings. And we all know that this is the right thing to do," Cooper said. He believes that the Coalition will be instrumental in raising awareness of the issue. The R2P Coalition is organizing an Illinois university student essay contest this fall to help define the theological, philosophical, domestic and international legal as well as policy sources and implications of R2P. The R2P Coalition has also partnered with The Chicago Council on Global Affairs (formerly Chicago Council on Foreign Relations) and is sponsoring a November 15-17 Conference entitled "The Responsibility to Protect: Engaging America". This conference will be the first major event of this kind and will develop a strategy to make R2P work. ()
The R2P Coalition is born of this commitment. A nonpartisan and not-for-profit grassroots organization, the mission of the R2P Coalition is to convince the American people and its leaders to embrace the norm of the Responsibility to Protect as a domestic and foreign policy priority. Among the founding members of the R2P Coalition Steering Committee are:
-- Gareth Evans, President and CEO, the International Crisis Group
-- Susan Mayer, Dean, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago
-- William Pace, Executive Director, Institute for Global Policy
-- Ken Roth, Executive Director, Human Rights Watch
-- Paul Rutgers, Executive Director, Council of Religious Leaders of Metropolitan Chicago
-- Adele Simmons, President, Global Philanthropy Partnership In addition to the Steering Committee, the R2P Advisory Board brings together eminent personalities who provide their advice and guidance.
These members include:
-- Cherif Bassiouni, President Emeritus, Human Rights Law Institute, DePaul University
-- Marshall Bouton, President, The Chicago Council on Global Affairs (formerly Chicago Council on Foreign Relations)
-- Mary Page, Director, Human Rights and International Justice, MacArthur Foundation-- Ruth Messinger, President, American Jewish World Service
-- David Scheffer, Director, Center for International Human Rights, Northwestern University School of Law
-- Gloria White-Hammond, Chairwoman, One Million Voices for Darfur
(...)For more information on the R2P Coalition, please contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and visit http://R2PCoalition.org

Full Article: Unavailable
 

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