Member Sign In
International Coalition for the Responsibility to Protect
PDF Print E-mail
The Impact of Conflict on Civilians in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile States – March 2014
Sudan Consortium
16 April 2014 
 
During the month of March, the number of attacks in Blue Nile increased significantly, with monitors on the ground reporting 66 bombs dropped on eight villages in 15 separate attacks. In addition, there were disturbing reports of prohibited stocks of anti-personnel landmines being discovered in vehicles captured from Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) by the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Army – North (SPLA-N) troops in ground fighting in Blue Nile.
 
In Southern Kordofan, although the number of air strikes launched by the Sudanese Air Force against civilians dropped during March, they nonetheless continued at a steady rate with ten bomb attacks recorded in the areas monitored by our partners. A total of four civilians were killed and 13 injured as a result of these attacks. All those killed were children. Another 3 children were injured, along with 4 women. While the number of air attacks decreased in Southern Kordofan during March, there were reports of increased activity on the ground by militia groups associated with the government of Sudan.
 
From the report:
“The Sudan Consortium works with a trusted group of local Sudanese partners who have been working on the ground in Southern Kordofan since the current conflict began in late 2011. All the attacks referred to in this report were launched against areas where there was no military presence and which were clearly identifiable as civilian in character. We believe that this information provides strong circumstantial evidence that civilians are being directly and deliberately targeted by the Sudanese armed forces in Southern Kordofan.”
 
See the full report here
 

Browse Documents by Region:

International Coalition for the Responsibility to Protect
c/o World Federalist Movement - Institute for Global Policy
708 Third Avenue, Suite 1715, New York, NY 10017
Contact