Member Sign In
International Coalition for the Responsibility to Protect
PDF Print E-mail
Human Rights Council discusses human rights situation in Syria
Human Rights Council
27 June 2012
 
The Human Rights Council this morning took up the human rights situation in Syria under its agenda item on human rights situations that require the Council’s attention.  It heard High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay present a report on Syria by the Secretary-General, and was briefed by Jean-Marie Guehenno, the Deputy Joint Special Envoy of the United Nations and the League of Arab States on Syria.  It then held an interactive dialogue with the Independent International Commission of Inquiry on Syria.  At the beginning of the meeting, the Council concluded its general debate on the promotion and protection of all human rights, civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights, including the right to development. (…)
 
Other speakers were concerned that in the name of human rights and supposed humanitarian action disguised under the imperial thesis of the “responsibility to protect”, interventionist mechanisms were presented as having to be established. The intervention of foreign forces would sow greater destruction, multiply deaths, and have serious implications for the region.  More dialogue and true will for negotiation was needed. Speakers rejected any undermining of the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Syria and condemned the pretentions of some countries to impose regime change on the Syrian people. (…)
 
Venezuela condemned the shocking assassination of innocents, among them women and children, in El-Houleh and called for a serious, impartial and independent investigation. The presence of terrorists and mercenaries had been identified, which sought to destabilize the Government through violent means. These armed groups were funded and trained by imperial powers and their allies.  Venezuela was concerned that in the name of human rights and supposed humanitarian action disguised under the imperial thesis of the “responsibility to protect”, interventionist mechanisms were presented as having to be established. It was not ideal to isolate Syria.  Venezuela supported and believed in the capacity of the Syrian Government and the Syrian people to solve their own problems.
 
European Union urged Syria to fully cooperate with the Commission of Inquiry and to provide access to the country, in view of ensuring that those responsible for violations were held to account, including the killing of children as young as nine years of age. The Syrian Government had the responsibility to protect its people, and it had failed to do so. The European Union condemned these indiscriminate and deliberate killings that may amount to crimes against humanity and other international crimes. The European Union asked the Commission to share findings regarding the situation of detainees held by the Government and on measures to put an end to impunity and ensure justice? (…)
 
Brazil was deeply concerned by the escalation of violence in Syria, the brunt of which was borne by defenceless civilians. The situation was alarming not only because of the mounting casualties but also because it was known that there was no military solution to the crisis.  Brazil joined Mr. Annan’s call for all parties to effectively and immediately abide by the six-point plan, before the crisis spiraled out of control.  The Syrian Government bore the primary responsibility to protect civilians and create the conditions necessary for the violence to stop, in order to allow for the beginning of an inclusive, Syrian-led political process aimed at democratically and effectively addressing the legitimate aspirations of the Syrian people.  (…)
 
Read the full report.

 

 

 


 

Browse Documents by Region:

International Coalition for the Responsibility to Protect
c/o World Federalist Movement - Institute for Global Policy
708 Third Avenue, Suite 1715, New York, NY 10017
Contact