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The RtoP and the ICC: Complementary in Prevention, Assistance and Response
ICRtoP Blog
14 March 2012
 
 
The International Criminal Court (ICC) has delivered its first ever verdict with a finding of guilty in the case of the Prosecutor vs. Thomas Lubanga Dyilo on 14 March 2012. In light of this, and with the ICC playing differing but integral roles in responding to mass atrocities in recent situations like Libya and Côte d’Ivoire, we would like to expand on the relationship between the Responsibility to Protect (RtoP) and the ICC. In this effort, we asked several ICRtoP member organizations (…) to provide their reflections on the relationship.
 
The Responsibility to Protect (RtoP) and the International Criminal Court (ICC) are two interconnected initiatives that seek to ensure that the world responds to mass atrocities and holds perpetrators of these egregious crimes accountable. At their core, however, the RtoP and the ICC are complementary in seeking to prevent these crimes from occurring altogether.
 
Both the RtoP and ICC articulate the primary responsibilities of states. The Rome Statute of the ICC provides that it is the primary responsibility of national authorities to investigate and prosecute individuals responsible for the commission of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity.
 
George Kegoro, Executive Director of the Kenya Section - International Commission of Jurists, explains this further: “The ICC is a ‘court of last resort’ – that is, its mandate is to prosecute only when domestic avenues have been exhausted, and where a State is unable or unwilling to prosecute those individuals responsible for the gravest of crimes.” (…)
 
(…) RtoP and the ICC are also complementary in instances where states are found both unable and unwilling to meet their responsibilities. The Rome Statute provides that when a state does not meet its primary obligations to prosecute individuals responsible for the commission of Statute crimes, it will ensure situations are investigated, warrants are issued, and those in its custody are prosecuted.
 
Similarly, when a state is found unable and unwilling to uphold its responsibility to protect civilians, the norm provides that the responsibility to protect those civilians yields to the UN and its Member States in cooperation with regional organizations. (…)
 
 
This ICRtoP blog post reflects on the country cases of Libya and the Côte d’Ivoire with regards to the International Criminal Court as a measure under the third pillar of RtoP; whether justice for victims of atrocity crimes can be pursued while attempting to secure a peaceful resolution to a conflict and vice versa (commonly known as the peace vs. justice debate); and the contribution the ICC can play in prevention and deterrence of mass atrocity crimes.
 
To read the full blog post, see here.
 
 

 

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