Member Sign In
International Coalition for the Responsibility to Protect
PDF Print E-mail



R2PCS Listserv
06 February 2008
Responsibility to Protect Engaging Civil Society
Web: www.responsibilitytoprotect.org
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it '; document.write( '' ); document.write( addy_text11975 ); document.write( '<\/a>' ); //--> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


In this issue:
[Featured Report by Genocide Intervention Network, Crisis in Kenya, Related Reports]



I. Featured Report by Genocide Intervention Network
1. GENOCIDE INTERVENTION NETWORK HIGHLIGHTS NINE AREAS WITH TARGETED MASS ATROCITIES AGAINST CIVILIANS


II. Crisis in Kenya
1. WORLD CANNNOT STAND BY AS KENYA BURNS
2. ODINGA URGES PEACEKEEPERS FOR KENYA
3. SECRETARY-GENERAL, ADDRESSING AFRICAN UNION SUMMIT, UNDERLINES KENYAN LEADERS RESPONSIBILITY TO RESOLVE SOURCES OF CONFLICT PEACEFULLY
4. WAYS TO END KENYAS KILLINGS: KOFI ANNAN GOT KENYAS TWO RIVALS TO AGREE TO TALKS, NEXT THEY MUST HELP END THE KILLING
5. VIOLENCE IN KENYA (JANUARY 31, 2008): STATEMENT MADE BY FOREIGN AND EUROPEAN AFFAIRS MINISTER BERNARD KOUCHNER


III. Related Reports
1. AFRICA ACTION RELEASES NEW REPORT ON INTERNATIONAL FAILURE TO PROTECT DARFUR
2. BURMA/MYANMAR: AFTER THE CRACKDOWN





I. Featured Report by Genocide Intervention Network


1. Genocide Intervention Network Highlights Nine Areas with Targeted Mass Atrocities Against Civilians: Hotspots Include Darfur, Burma and Kenya
Genocide Intervention Network
31 January 2008

(...) According to GI-Net's findings, civilians in the Darfur region of Sudan continue to suffer forced displacement and multiple forms of violence. The government of Sudan is still funding the Janjaweed, obstructing the deployment of an international peacekeeping force, and continuing to severely limit access to aid. Meanwhile, the regime in Burma continues its military campaign ongoing since 1962 to drive out, terrify, and dominate minority groups in rural areas.

In addition to Darfur and Burma, other areas of concern include: Kenya, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Chad, Central African Republic, Iraq, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. These conflicts were selected, through a comparative analysis of nearly 90 armed conflicts around the world, on the basis of the scale and nature of atrocities targeting civilians. The listed areas of concern reflect the "hotspots" of the world where civilians are being targeted on the largest scale.

"The international community has a special responsibility in cases of genocide and mass atrocities to ensure slaughters such as the Holocaust and the Rwandan genocide do not occur once again," said Genocide Intervention Network Executive Director Mark Hanis. (...) "We hope this analysis will help remind political leaders of the world's responsibility to protect civilians from atrocities occurring in states where the governments are unwilling or unable to do so." (...)

Full text:
http://www.genocideintervention.net/network/pressroom/pressreleases/2008/01/31/1470

To learn more on GI-Nets Areas of Concern, please visit:
http://www.genocideintervention.net/educate/crisis/overview





II. Crisis in Kenya


1. World Cannot Stand by as Kenya Burns
The Ottawa Citizen
Richard Nsanzabaganwa
04 February 2008

(...) In Kenya, around 1,000 people were reportedly killed since last December and almost 300,000 displaced by inter-ethnic fighting. The current crisis in Kenya exposes a clear lack of political maturity among Kenyan rulers. There are no acceptable root causes that justify the mayhem that Kenyans are facing today. (...)

(...) Actions need to be taken without further delay to halt the violence [in Kenya]. While current political mediations are relevant, steady and quick actions must to be taken by other Kenyan institutions such as the Parliament or even security organs, if necessary, to restore order as early as possible.

The international community should not shy away from telling President Mwai Kibaki and opposition leader Raila Odinga that they bear heavy responsibility for the suffering of the Kenyan people, and make it clear to them that the near future will hold them accountable.

(...) The situation in Kenya also calls for the International Criminal Court that was established to help prevent massive commission of crimes and help restore public order by prosecuting crimes of international nature.

Kenya has accepted the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court over genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. (...)

Full text:
http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/views/story.html?id=807643ab-9b68-40a9-9b6b-4f0ea5abc5f6



2. Odinga Urges Peacekeepers for Kenya
Aljazeera.net
03 February 2008

Raila Odinga, the Kenyan opposition leader, has called for African Union (AU) peacekeepers to be deployed in the country to quell ethnic violence that erupted after last years disputed presidential elections.

(...) Western Kenya has seen some of the worst ethnic clashes in the violence that has killed more than 800 people since December 27. (...) The latest deaths brought the total to about 70 dead since Friday in area where police have now launched a crackdown on ethnic fighting.

(...) A deal marking out a joint roadmap to end, within two weeks, the violence was agreed last week but it was unclear how the political issues would be addressed.

The agreement calls for illegal militias to be disbanded and for investigation of all crimes connected to the violence, including those allegedly committed by the police, who have killed scores of people.

(...) Despite the efforts of Kofi Annan, the former UN secretary-general, Kibaki and Odinga remain opposed. (...)

Full text:
http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/7A56C073-43E4-49DA-930C-99CFBCCBE3BE.htm



3. Secretary-General, Addressing African Union Summit, Underlines Kenyan Leaders Responsibility to Resolve Sources of Conflict Peacefully
ReliefWeb
United Nations Secretary-General
31 January 2008

Following is the text of UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moons address to the Summit of the African Union in Addis Ababa [on] 31 January:

(...) Sadly, I have to start the substance of my address to you with a reminder of the alarming developments in Kenya. More than 800 people have already lost their lives in the increasingly ethnic clashes triggered by the aftermath of the recent elections. Violence continues, threatening to escalate to catastrophic levels. Kenyan leaders, President Mwai Kibaki and ODM leader Raila Odinga, in particular, have the responsibility to do everything possible to resolve the sources of the crisis peacefully.

(...) In the meantime, increased emergency assistance needs to be provided to alleviate the suffering of Kenyans affected by the violence.

Close partnerships are crucial for addressing the continents peace and security challenges. The United Nations and the African Union have a long-standing and fruitful collaboration in this field.

(...) On my way to this Summit meeting, I visited Rwanda, where the international community learned a painful lesson. We should not repeat such atrocities. I am fully committed to keep the momentum that you the leaders have made at the 2005 World Summit and will spare no effort to operationalize the responsibility to protect. (...)

Full text:
http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/RWB.NSF/db900SID/THOU-7BE29U?OpenDocument

UN Security Council discusses latest violence engulfing Kenya, 30 January 2008:
http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=25458&Cr=kenya&Cr1=



4. Ways to End Kenyas Killings: Kofi Annan Got Kenyas Two Rivals to Agree to Talks, Next They Must Help End the Killing
The Christian Science Monitor
31 January 2008

(...) Mediator Kofi Annan got the two political rivals in [Kenyas] tragedy to sign onto negotiations. But much more is needed to halt ethnic cleansing in this latest African trouble spot.

(...) The police, according to news reports, are either overwhelmed or part of the problem, siding with President Mwai Kibaki's Kikuyu tribe.

The government has mostly hesitated to deploy the military, reportedly because many of its members favor the opposition, led by Raila Odinga, of the Luo tribe. (...)

In the absence of reliable security forces, more than 850 Kenyans have been killed, and more than 250,000 have been displaced. America's top envoy for Africa this week described the Rift Valley killings as "ethnic cleansing" against Kikuyus, and Rwanda's president said Kenya should bring in the Army to prevent further escalation. Indeed, many in Kenya now fear civil war.

(...) The international community, meanwhile, should apply maximum pressure on Kenya's political elite, including the threat of international prosecution and targeted sanctions (wisely, the US says it is reviewing all aid to Kenya).

It is Kenya's responsibility to protect its own population, and its business and other leaders are pressing the political rivals to reach agreement.

But in 2005, members of the UN signed on to a responsibility to intervene if "national authorities are manifestly failing to protect their populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity."

Is Kenya there yet? That's not clear, but the international community should be making plans now. (...)

Full text:
http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0131/p08s01-comv.html



5. Violence in Kenya (January 31, 2008): Statement Made by Foreign and European Affairs Minister Bernard Kouchner
France Diplomatie
31 January 2008

We are very concerned about the violence which is continuing to convulse Kenya, causing many victims and bringing the number of displaced persons to 290,000 in a very disturbing humanitarian context. (...)

We fear lest these excesses plunge Kenya into a deadly conflict of an ethnic character.

(...) The solution is political and must be swift. Both parties now face a historic responsibility: choose dialogue or bear responsibility for a political and human catastrophe.

France reaffirms its confidence in Mr. Kofi Annan to pursue his mediation. It also reaffirms its support for the efforts of the African Union and the United Nations Secretary-General to end the violence and find a political solution to the crisis.

In the name of the responsibility to protect, it is urgent to help the people of Kenya. The United Nations Security Council must take up this question and act.

Full text:
http://www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/en/country-files_156/kenya_209/situation-in-kenya-2008_6019/situation-in-kenya-statement-by-bernard-kouchner-january-31-2008_10767.html

To read the Ministry Spokepersons answers made during the 1st February press briefing, please visit:
http://www.ambafrance-us.org/news/briefing/us010208.asp#7

To read Statesman Without Borders, The New York Times, by James Traub on Bernard Kouchner's role in advocating humanitarian intervention, please follow:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/03/magazine/03kouchner-t.html





III. Related Reports


1. Africa Action Releases New Report on International Failure to Protect Darfur: More Resources, Diplomatic Pressure Vital to Success of Peacekeepers
Africa Action
31 January 2008

Thursday, January 31 (Washington, DC) Today, half a year after the passage of UN Security Council Resolution 1769 on July 31, 2007, Africa Action releases new analysis detailing the failure of the international community to deploy the peacekeeping force for Darfur authorized by this resolution. Africa Action calls on the Bush administration to put its words into action and move from rhetorical opposition to genocide to proactive engagement with the United Nations to achieve the fully resourced deployment of the complete ybrid UN-African Union force (UNAMID) that the Security Council called for six months ago.

Over the past months, UN officials and humanitarian groups operating in Sudan have warned that UNAMID is on the brink of collapse, and recent estimates caution that it may take most of 2008 to deploy the complete mission. (...)

(...) The government of Sudan has yet to accept a UN Status of Forces Agreement that would allow UNAMID personnel the operational freedoms, such as freedom of movement and communications and the ability to conduct flights after dark that they need to fulfill their mandate.

(...) After the premeditated January 7 attacks on a clearly marked UN convoy by Sudanese military forces, the U.S. and the international community can no longer hide from the fact that Khartoum bears the primary responsibility for the suffering of Darfurs civilians. It is unacceptable for the U.S. to prioritize ar on Terror intelligence interests in Khartoum over the lives of Sudans people.r
Full text:
http://www.africaaction.org/newsroom/release.php?op=read&documentid=2752&type=2&issues=1024

Africa Action Report, released January 2008: ix Months Since 1769: An Overview of Conflict in Sudan and the International Failure to Protect: August 2007 January 2008:
http://www.africaaction.org/resources/page.php?op=read&documentid=2750&type=6&issues=1024

For all the latest analysis on the crisis in Darfur, please visit:
http://www.africaaction.org/campaign_new/darfur.php



2. Burma/Myanmar: After the Crackdown
International Crisis Group
31 January 2008

The International Crisis Group released on 31 January 2008 its latest report, entitled urma/Myanmar: After the Crackdown. The investigation examines the implications of the mass protests that took place in September 2007 in Burma and the violent response to them. Drawing on the responsibilities and strenghts of the United Nations, the countrys neighbours as well as the large international community, the Crisis Group report provides recommendation to the Burmese humanitarian crisis.

The new report urges that all international actors in the political arena that have some ability to influence the situation need to become actively involved in working toward a positive change.


To see urma/Myanmar: After the Crackdown, Asia Report # 144 31 January 2008, please visit:
http://www.crisisgroup.org/library/documents/asia/burma_myanmar/144_burma_myanmar___after_the_crackdown.pdf


 

Browse Documents by Region:

International Coalition for the Responsibility to Protect
c/o World Federalist Movement - Institute for Global Policy
708 Third Avenue, Suite 1715, New York, NY 10017
Contact